Showing category "Control the Controllables" (Show all posts)

Playing like jumpers for goal posts in the fight for relegation and promotion in the Football League

Posted by David Harrison on Friday, April 18, 2014, In : Control the Controllables 

The football league is drawing to its conclusion and there are teams fighting for relegation and promotion.  This is why love football but this time of the season is fascinating from a mental perspective.  Inevitably teams will miss out on the prize of staying up and be relegated or promotion to the league above.  These teams need to play the game and not the occasion (A colleague of mine used this during a conversion and I think it’s brilliant) and they need to play to win as opposed playi...


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'Calm Intensity' Reflection on Interview by GB Rowers

Posted by David Harrison on Friday, August 3, 2012, In : Control the Controllables 

Whilst watching an interview by one of the rowing crews of Great Britain one of the rowers mentioned the term "calm intensity".  This is a great wat to term how an athlete should approach the mindset of competition. 

Athletes should be calm and relaxed as when an athlete does this they can 'do without thinking' and compete in the present.  Very similar to how children play in the park.  If they are relaxed then they will also expel less energy and this energy could be the difference betwe...


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Invictus

Posted by David Harrison on Wednesday, August 1, 2012, In : Control the Controllables 

This is one of the best poems I have read and reinforces the need for self belief and the need to be in control, Control the Controllables. The poem is by William Ernest Henley

Out of the night that covers me,
Black as the Pit from pole to pole,
I thank whatever gods may be
For my unconquerable soul.

In the fell clutch of circumstance
I have not winced nor cried aloud.
Under the bludgeonings of chance
My head is bloody, but unbowed.

Beyond this place of wrath and tears
Looms but the Horror of the...


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Wimbledon Final 2012 - The mentality of Andy Murray

Posted by David Harrison on Sunday, July 8, 2012, In : Control the Controllables 

The Strategy for Andy Murray in the Wimbledon final 2012 is simple. When he plays Rodger Federer he needs to manage andcontrol the pressure of the occasion. There will be millions watching as 'Murray Fever' sweeps the nation as he plays in the final with the hope of winning for the first time since Fred Perry in 1936.  

There are two strategies for Andy Murray to manage the pressure.  The first, in the preparation for today's final and during the match he needs to control the controllable...


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Comment on The Pschology of the League 1 Play Off Final - Sheffield United

Posted by David Harrison on Saturday, May 26, 2012, In : Control the Controllables 
I got this comment on my Facebook about yesterday's blog about Sheffield United. Andy is a good friend of mine and an ex pro who is also a sport psychologist. It's another way to look at the game today.

' enjoyed reading that, Dave. Here's some observations from my own experiences, which may or may not be of use. Professional sportspeople thrive on these occasions. It's these occasions that some athletes have worked their whole life's towa
rds. To simply try to ignore this could deter the pla...

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The Pschology of the League 1 Play Off Final - Sheffield United

Posted by David Harrison on Friday, May 25, 2012, In : Control the Controllables 

Sheffield United play Huddersfield town in the League 1 playoff final. The winner will gain promotion to the Npower Championship. Sheffield United need to approach the game in a certain way mentally because as a a club the Blades have not won a play off final on their previous 3 visits.

They need to play the game and not the occasion (A colleague of mine used this during a conversion and I think its brilliant) and they need to play to win as opposed playing not to lose.

Playing the game and...


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The Psychology of Football - Playing to Win as Opposed to Playing not to Lose

Posted by David Harrison on Saturday, May 5, 2012, In : Control the Controllables 


On the final day of League 1 11/12 football season 2 teams are fighting for promotion to the Championship. To compound matters the 2 teams are city rivals, members of the Steel city, Sheffield Wednesday and Sheffield United. The Owls versus the Blades, the Blues versus the Reds. On the penulitmate round of fixtures Sheffield United were in the driving seat but a disappointing draw at home and an away win for Sheffield Wednesday switched the positions and put the Owls on top.  Today sees bot...


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The Mental side of the Boat Race 2012

Posted by David Harrison on Sunday, April 8, 2012, In : Control the Controllables 

The 158th Oxford and Cambridge University Boat Race will be remembered for a lot of things, the distressing scenes at the finishing line when the Bowman of the Oxford crew colapsed, the broken oar that resulted in Cambridge racing away to win and the cause of the broken oar, the enforced restart caused by a swimmer apparently protesting about elitism.  These are all additional considerations to respond to and focus on for the rowers as well as the gruelling course on the Thames which is the p...


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The Journey: The Elements for Success, Winning and Increased Performance in Sport, Business and Life


David Harrison Using sport psychology principles and performance psychology strategies from elite sport and business this blog highlights the elements needed for success, winning and increased performance. Whether lacking motivation, struggling to manage pressure or loss of confidence; the posts in this blog can help.

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